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Training

Improving T2B

Some common problems I see with toe-2-bar each week are that members have not developed the prerequisite strength to kip T2B effectively, losing active tension while bringing your feet down from the bar, and not understanding the relationship your chest, hips, and feet should have to the bar in order to effectively perform the movement. Prerequisite strength: as with every CrossFit movement there is a progression to being successful. Strength should be built through a strict range of motion before adding a kip to the movement. While it may be an aggressive prerequisite for kipping T2B, I feel if you have 5 consecutive strict reps that learning to then kip the movement will be much easier. I commonly see frustration in the gym from people trying to kip movements that they cannot perform strict for even one rep. Get strong by doing the movement strict and then develop the skill of kipping; don’t think of kipping as a shortcut to do a movement sooner. Active through the entire range of motion: when kipping a T2B getting your toes to touch the bar is only half the battle. I frequently see people swing their feet up to the bar for a successful rep only to allow their bottom half to drop like a sack of potatoes on the return back down. This turns your kip into a swing and nullifies any efficiency you could hope to have in the movement. Instead, once your feet reach the bar you must actively bring them back down through the same path they went up. The entire movement is active on your part, there is no passive portion where you are taking a break. Relation of chest, hips, and feet to the bar: there is a reason we practice our hollow and arch positions each week as they are the building blocks for kipping T2B. During effective T2B in the bottom position your feet are behind the bar and your chest is in front of the bar. Conversely, in the top position your chest is behind the bar while your feet are in front of […]

Front squat grip

How many fingers should be on the bar when you front squat? The answer depends largely on your flexibility. When new members start front squatting I assess their mobility restrictions and often tell them to use a two finger grip when front squatting. This allows elbows to be in good position and to get the bar on their shoulders instead of in their hands. However, I also tell new members, while I tell you this is correct today I reserve the right to tell you something different in 30, 60, or 90 days. This is because learning with two fingers may be the easiest but it doesn’t mean it’s the best way to hold a bar when front squatting. As seen in the pictures above of world class weightlifters, Mattie Rogers and Dmitry Klokov, actually having a four finger grip is something you should aim for. This is because you want to activate your thoracic spine musculature when front squatting as much as possible. You don’t often miss a front squat because the weight is too heavy for your legs to squat. If we put the same weight on your back, squatting it would be no problem. The issue is losing your posture and leaning forward; the bar moves too far forward of your center of mass and you miss the lift. Activation of your thoracic spine musculature helps to maintain your upright posture. If you have been a two finger gripper for a long time I can promise you this change will feel odd. However, if you have the flexibility to grip the bar across your calluses for the entire movement I highly recommend making the change to improve your front squat long term. If your flexibility limits you to two fingers that is okay but please realize you should be improving your mobility and striving to improve your grip. Watch the following video from former Olympic gold medalist, Aleskey Torokhtiy, for a brief discussion and demo of the front squat. Make sure to turn the subtitles on!

World Weightlifting Championships

Olympic lifting is a staple of our programming and I don’t see that changing. Clean and jerks and snatches improve your speed, strength, power, coordination, mobility, agility, endurance, balance, and accuracy. I’m sure I can come up with more but you get the point. While the people in the gym that really love these lifts probably already know this but the Weightlifting World Championships are this week and they are being held in Anaheim, California. The event being held in the US is a nice perk because the pacific time zone makes the action much easier to follow than when the event is held on the other side of the world. While I understand that watching this event is like watching Lebron James play basketball or Serena Williams play tennis and that our skill sets don’t exactly translate to what we are seeing. It’s a great opportunity to learn about the sport and the lifts. I know every time I watch a live event streamed I pick up at least one thing I didn’t know from the announcing team.  The links below bring you to a couple websites so you can stream the event live, get an official start list for anyone you may want to follow, and a list of the USA Weightlifting team members there participating STREAM THE EVENT START LIST USA TEAM MEMBERS

Improving your rope climbs

A quick technique note on improving your rope climbs! To improve your rope climbs consider the following tip to get a more secure hold with your feet and therefore take the onus off of your arms. When scooping your bottom foot to create a foot lock simply continue the bottom foot over the top and step on the forefoot of the other foot. The first picture shows the very common but not as secure foot lock used in the gym. However, the second picture shows the foothold with the scoop foot over the top and on the other foot. This foothold is more secure and will not require more time on your part. After getting used to the change you should expect rope climbs to be less fatiguing on your upper body. Also check out this short video from CrossFit games competitors, Matt Chan and Spencer Hendel, explaining how to properly secure this foothold.

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CrossFit 12866

CrossFit 12866 is more than a gym; it is a friendly and encouraging community of members achieving their fitness goals. By our gym catering to no one, we cater to everyone. We have members ranging in age from 14 all the way to early-70’s. Our members are high school and college students, working professionals, busy moms and dads, and retirees.

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Saratoga Springs, NY 12866
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